Low-Key May Day March and Rally in Liverpool

About eight hundred people – including many from the striking Public and Commercial Services union – marched through Liverpool city centre this afternoon, in an event organised by Merseyside TUC.

The event was smaller than in the last few years, partly because today was a work day for most. However, the PCS strikers swelled the numbers, and showed a great example to others by honouring the noble tradition of May Day strikes (even if they will be back in work tomorrow).

The march started from St George’s Plateau on Lime Street, and made its (very quiet) way down to the Victoria Monument in Derby Square. Merseyside TUC President Alec McFadden apologised for the lack of a festival (which is down to the fact the TUC haven’t bothered to organise one this year), before descending into his usual football jokes.

Lindsey German of the Stop The War Coalition – co-author of a recent humble letter to Gordon Brown – made all the usual noises about pressurising the government into listening to people before they go invading next time. This, despite the fact that the failure of Stop The War’s strategy to actually stop any wars is staring everyone in the face.

Then John McDonnell – the least right wing candidate for the Labour leadership when Blair finally throws in the towel – presented his case (which basically amounted to ‘trust me to sort it all out for you’). McFadden openly encouraged the crowd to vote for McDonnell in the Labour leadership election, which of course would mean joining the Labour Party, and handing over money for the party’s anti-worker campaigns.

After that it was time for music and beer, so this journalist went off in pursuit of some more radical activity

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2 thoughts on “Low-Key May Day March and Rally in Liverpool

  1. Other

    “the least right wing candidate for the Labour leadership when Blair finally throws in the towel – presented his case (which basically amounted to ‘trust me to sort it all out for you’). McFadden openly encouraged the crowd to vote for McDonnell in the Labour leadership election, which of course would mean joining the Labour Party, and handing over money for the party’s anti-worker campaigns.”You’ll never change anything with an attitude like that, you are what we call in the movementan “impossiblist” living in pure yet impotent political isolation. Democracies get the governments they deserve, why? Becasue the attitude that you have prevails, people just dont want to get their poor pretty hands dirty. like it or not the Labour party holds the best potential (emphasis) for positive change, not least because of its ties to the unions. If you cant be bothered to stop gordon brown and nu-lab in a forum where you can actually exert influence, then you have no right to complain!

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  2. Adam Ford

    We’ll see who feels impotent when your man gets thrashed in a few weeks. My (or rather our) power (potentially) comes from the millions of people in this country who expect no great change whoever is Prime Minister, and indeed from the billions around the world in similar positions. If you think voting can change things, it is you who is the impossibilist. How many times do you need to be proved wrong?

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